Here’s a bit on borrowing material from other sources.

Within the article, where you are talking about an idea — and the idea is not your own — you need to tell the readers honestly which source (website, book, magazine, paper, journal, etc.) the idea was borrowed from. You can write something like the following:

The Times noted in an article, article title here, that… (the idea continues here).

By doing the above, we are telling the readers that this idea does not belong to us. We did our research on the topic and borrowed the idea from The Times.

In case of quotes, if you did not take the quote first hand and borrowed it from a news site or magazine, you need to write a variation of the following:

“The quote here,” The Times quoted Mark Zuckerberg, CEO, Facebook, as saying.

So attribute all the borrowed ideas and information bits you put in the article to their sources (as exemplified above) at least three times throughout the article.

Because we expect the best from a writer of your caliber, you need to meet the following requirements towards researching and attributing the information:

ü  Research on at least four good sources, and provide attribution to the sources of your information at least three times throughout the article.

ü  Provide quotes from at least three speakers quoted in as many source sites.

  • Link out to the source site, using the following HTML code: <a href=”URL of the source site”>The Times (website’s official name, not the home page URL)</a>.
  • The attribution will typically read like the following: “The quote here,” The Times quoted Mark Zuckerberg, CEO, Facebook, as saying.
  • With HTML coding, it reads like this: “The quote here,” <a href=”URL of the source site”>The Times (website’s official name, not the home page URL)</a> quoted Mark Zuckerberg, CEO, Facebook, as saying.

Any questions on the above? Just get in touch with the core team — shoot us a mail, message us on Yahoo Messenger, or just give us a tinkle.

Happy writing,

Cosmos Writers Editorial Team