Don’t repeat the same bit of information in the article. It shows very badly on the writer.

Repetition only reduces the limited number of words we have to keep the reader interested in reading. Here’s a fitting example of repetition, with the duplicate ideas in blue:

The NIH has named a total of 36 institutions till date that will take part in the study and a few more are expected to be picked in the future. It will recruit study volunteers from various locations. When it is fully operational, 1,000 children will be recruited from 105 counties across the United States. Each funded study center will recruit children from two to three different counties…

…The NIH said that the people taking part will be from rural, urban and suburban areas, from all income and educational levels and from all racial groups. It also hopes that the study (to be conducted at 105 locations throughout the United State) can help pinpoint early-life influences that affect later development, with the goal of learning new ways to treat or prevent illness…

100,000 U.S. children from inception to the age of 21.

And then again, later in the article:

When it is fully operational, 1,000 children will be recruited from 105 counties across the United States.

What’s the point of repeating the same information so many times?

Take this one more example:

Nearly everyone is prone to some sneaking disease like influenza. One can find almost everyone who has suffered through them occasionally. No matter how healthy our lifestyle and eating habits are, one can often find the stealthy flu playing havoc with the immune system of almost all individuals.

Both the sentences in the para above are saying the same thing. The part in italics is just asking for it.

Any questions on the above? Just get in touch with the core team — shoot us a mail, message us on Yahoo Messenger, or just give us a tinkle.

Happy writing,

Harpreet Bhagrath